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Ting gets Lifehacker’d

A recent Lifehacker article titled How to Get Out Of Your Cell Phone Contract Without Paying Termination Fees in the Saving Money section mentions Ting and our Dump Your Contract Month sweeps. The article goes on to call out our unique approach to the wireless business.

It’s driving some nice traffic to the Ting site; people looking to save money on mobile phone service by paying for what they use as opposed to paying a premium for unlimited. Presumably, it’s also driving people to the ABC News post about DYCM that’s linked in the story. So, if you found your way here from Lifehacker (or from ABC News): welcome! Get your entry in to the Dump Your Contract Month sweeps while there’s still time.

On a personal note, I’d like to say thanks to Lifehacker. First for including Ting in the roundup of ways to get out of your contract and second for the great Android rooting help and the sweet routers running Tomato firmware I have at home.

CISPA and protecting your personal online freedom

During the SOPA / PIPA debacle, Internet denizens came out in droves to beat the bills back and protect our collective online rights. We, as in the Internet at large, said that the battle was won but the war would continue. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act is the latest attempt at an affront to your online freedom.

CISPA hits the senate floor for voting in early June having already passed the US House of Representatives. If passed by the Senate, the last hope to get CISPA sent back to the proverbial drawing board would be a White House veto.

If passed, CISPA would provide broad authority to government organizations to collect and pass information between agencies. “Cyber threat information,” as the bill puts it. Ostensibly, CISPA is intended as a response to cyber security threats from hackers, terrorists or criminals. CISPA would give broad allowances for government agencies to pass our private information and communications between themselves. Currently, doing so leaves said agencies open to lawsuits from private citizens. Perhaps more disturbing, it allows (or could force) private organizations to pass information to government agencies under the same provisions.

The language in CISPA is in some cases so vague that it would be too easy to put to ill use. The powers afforded are too broad and would allow the government and private corporations like Facebook, Google et. al. to pass private information freely, with impunity. All under the guise of protecting against a “cyber threat.” The language explaining what exactly constitutes a cyber threat is also too broadly and loosely defined (see page 15 of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) and potentially sacrifices too many of our personal freedoms.

Our issues with CISPA are many. As concerned Internet citizens, we worry about what it would mean for personal online privacy—both yours and our own. As an Internet company that takes your privacy very (very) seriously, we worry about our ability to protect your online privacy, for our part, will be severely compromised.

If you feel, as we do, that CISPA is an ill conceived and too loosely defined a bill, please make your voices heard.

At Tucows and Ting, we feel that the Internet—whether accessed on your computer, on your smartphone or via any other vehicle—is vitally important. CISPA is a very serious threat to the freedom and privacy we take for granted online.

Five Extreme Ways to Lower your Cell Phone Bill

Appolicious site logoRecently, Appolicious saw its way clear to include Ting in its Five extreme ways to lower your cell phone bill article. Aside from being fans of the site in general, we’re genuinely chuffed to have been included in the roundup.

When we first started talking about Ting, we worried whether the wireless-buying public would “get it;” the Ting idea is a unique one in that we don’t bundle services together into plans. Rather, we offer different buckets for voice minutes, text messages and megabytes that would-be users can choose from. Allowing an unlimited number of devices on an account with minutes, messages and megabytes pooled and shared between devices is also unique in the industry.

We (as in Ting) see this as a logical way to buy and use mobile service. That said, we (as in the mobile buying public) have been conditioned to expect bundled minutes, messages and megabytes along with penalties for using more than we expected. Likewise, we’ve been conditioned to accept two-year contracts that can’t be breached on pain of death. Well maybe not death… but grievous injury to the pocketbook.

Apparently, we needn’t have worried. This Appolicious article, and others we’ll link to at the end of this post, goes to show that people get it. Separating out minutes, messages and megabytes, eschewing contracts and generally giving customers the tools they need to control their usage and bills isn’t such an out-there concept. It’s also heartening to see other uniquely Ting concepts brought to light. Specifically, automatically bumping users up to the next bucket if they use more than they thought they would or dropping them down and crediting their next bill if they use less.

This article, and the many more column inches we’re grateful to have received, shows that we have some work to do yet. Specifically, we need to do a better job of explaining why asking users to buy their own device as opposed to offering a deeply discounted device by signing a contract is a strength as opposed to a weakness. That’s a subject for another post but the short version: You’re better off buying a device on a credit card than getting one from a mobile service provider. Even the high interest rates that plastic providers demand are better than the rates a mobile provider offers.

If we have any quibble with the article it’s with the headline. “Five extreme ways to lower your cell phone bill” could just as easily be “five varyingly logical ways to lower your cell phone bill” though in fairness, it has nowhere near the same cachet.

Ting Elsewhere in the News

TechCrunch: Tucows Officially Launches Ting, a More Thoughtful Wireless Carrier

CNET: New Ting Cell Phone Service Turns Contracts on Their Head

Gigaom: Look Out Big Telcos: Ting Shares Data Across Devices

Engadget: Tucows Launches a Contract-Free Mobile Service on Sprint's Network

Fox Business: New Mobile Carrier Ting Offers Truly Customizable Smartphone Plans

PC Mag: Tucows Launches Contract-Free Mobile Provider Ting

MobileBurn: Ting's No Contract, Pain-Free Wireless Services Now Available