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Centennial, CO

Help us decide where to build crazy fast fiber Internet next. Pre-order today

Why does Ting charge a one-time pre-order?

centennial

Why it costs $9 to pre-order Ting Internet

$9 isn’t a lot of money by most accounts. Still, if someone is asking you to fork over $9, you may, quite reasonably, have a couple questions as to why and what you’re getting in return. Let’s break it down.

fiberWe’re looking at pre-orders as “votes” for a particular neighborhood or part of town. Building crazy fast fiber Internet networks isn’t cheap and it isn’t easy. Obviously, an individual contributing $9 isn’t going to have any real financial impact on the build. That is to say, it’s not so much about the money as it is about getting skin in the game, so to speak.

Building the infrastructure needed to get a neighborhood connected then connecting whole streets and individual houses with fiber to the home doesn’t happen overnight. There’s a lot of work and initial investment involved. There are certain thresholds of interest that need to be met before the effort makes sense.

Cord cutting tips on turning your TV into a music-playing centerpiece

cord cutting music

Cord cutting for music fans

Spring is almost here and for many, that means gearing up for graduation parties and family cook-outs. Music is a major part of every party, so what better way to enjoy it than by turning your huge TV into a musical entertainment centerpiece?

Forget the so-called music channels on cable TV. If you’re cord cutting, there are several great music services suitable for your TV. Here are a few of our favorites to get you started.

Your Internet speed wired in compared to Wi-Fi

Internet speed

Comparing wired-in Internet speed to Wi-Fi

Wi-Fi was a total game-changer; no longer was the Internet connection confined to the desk or the reach of an Ethernet cable. Now, whether you’re at home, work or in the local coffee shop, when you access the Internet, chances are good you’re doing so wirelessly.

While the benefits of Wi-Fi are obvious, it has its limitations. The biggest trade-off is Internet speed. If you’re on a gigabit connection, you cannot take full advantage of all the bandwidth that’s available to you on a single Wi-Fi device. The real power of gigabit comes when you have multiple Wi-Fi devices connected to the network with no slowdown whatsoever. That said, for the absolute fastest speeds on a single device (and especially if you’re conducting a speed test to see your maximum throughput) you’ll want to go wired.

If you’ve ever conducted an Internet speed test of your home Wi-Fi and compared it to a wired connection, you’ve seen the difference first-hand. Here’s what’s going on.

Why fiber Internet? For our growing digital needs, of course.

Why fiber Internet

It might surprise you to know that today, the main backbone of the Internet in America is fiber. The undersea cables that connect the continents are fiber. Without fiber, the Internet becomes more like the Internot.

So why isn’t fiber to the home (FTTH) more widespread? The fiber gap exists because many ISPs rely on dated copper wiring to connect back to the network. Copper wiring was a purpose-built infrastructure for telephones and later, for cable TV. It wasn’t built with the Internet in mind. It has limited bandwidth, it’s slow relative to fiber and it suffers signal degradation over distances.

A fiber connection can increase home value

home value

Increase home value with a fiber Internet connection

Did you know fiber Internet can boost home value?

A 2015 study commissioned by the Fiber to the Home Council Americas (FTTH) found that the impact of fiber on property values can be more than three percent. On a $300,000 home, that’s a $9,000 boost.

A fiber connection has an impact on home prices similar to other home improvement projects. Many homeowners opt to renovate and upgrade their homes and properties. These improvements, like redoing the kitchen, putting in hardwood floors or investing in landscaping, can be attractive features to prospective home buyers.

The increase calculated by the FTTH study was $5,437, based on the value of an average US home. To put that boost in perspective, it’s equal to adding a fireplace, half of a bathroom or a quarter of a swimming pool. Not literally, of course; no one wants a quarter of a swimming pool.

Today, people are shopping for more than just curb appeal. They’re looking for a quality Internet connection.

Meet Ting’s City Manager in Centennial, Mark Gotto

Mark Grotto

Meet Mark Gotto

Mark GrottoBorn and raised in Iowa, Mark Gotto has 20 years of experience in the telecom and communications industry.

Mark made Denver his home in 1988. In 2011, he resigned from the telecom world to be a stay-at-home dad. While Mark continued some consulting on the side, he dedicated his time to raising his son Hayden and daughter Grace. He then ran for and won a four-year term as a member of the Centennial City Council. Mark brings a wealth of experience to his new role at Ting, and with a background in telecom and public service, he’s kind of the perfect fit.