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When less is more: A roundup of our favorite flip phones

Thinking about a feature phone that can talk, text and not too much more than that? This one’s for you.

A simple flip phone is easy on the wallet, has battery life that’s measured in days instead of hours and cuts digital temptation off at the knee. Feature phones also serve as a great backup and are a perfect gift for the technophobe in your life.

There’s a small but growing movement back to ye olde dumbphone (the counterpoint to a smartphone has to be a dumbphone, right?) While the appeal of having a pocketable computer with which to remain connected is undeniable, smartphones demand your attention. Perhaps too effectively. We’ve talked about going greyscale to resist the smartphone siren song but that’s a half measure.

Below, we’ve listed some of the most popular flip phones that are compatible with at least one of Ting’s two nationwide LTE network options.

 

1. Alcatel A392

$63 | Ting Shop | GSM network

Flip phones are so outdated they’re almost back in style again, and with the Alcatel A392, it’s clear why.

The classic flip phone was never as sleek as this device, featuring a 0.67-inch thickness that’s the definition of pocket-friendly and smooth styling. The sturdy casing and flip-functionality means you can say goodbye to butt dials and annoying lock screen passwords.

With up to 32 GB of storage with a MicroSD card, there’s lots of room for music and files or even videos and pics, if you are content to view them on the 2.4-inch screen. Easy Bluetooth connectivity and large keys make it easy to use, even for the tech-phobic.

The Alcatel’s audio playback is surprisingly strong for a flip phone, and even includes built-in FM radio. For added convenience, an external screen keeps you updated on date, time and status when you’ve got the phone closed.

Why fiber Internet? For our growing digital needs, of course.

Why fiber Internet

It might surprise you to know that today, the main backbone of the Internet in America is fiber. The undersea cables that connect the continents are fiber. Without fiber, the Internet becomes more like the Internot.

So why isn’t fiber to the home (FTTH) more widespread? The fiber gap exists because many ISPs rely on dated copper wiring to connect back to the network. Copper wiring was a purpose-built infrastructure for telephones and later, for cable TV. It wasn’t built with the Internet in mind. It has limited bandwidth, it’s slow relative to fiber and it suffers signal degradation over distances.

You don’t need the latest iPhone. Here’s why.

iPhone 7

If you’re looking at that iPhone X price tag while turning your pockets inside out in protest, we get it. As far as phones go, the $1000 plus range feels gratuitous at best.

But if you’re using a battered iPhone 5C and thinking, I’m in need of an upgrade now, don’t worry. There are more budget-friendly iPhone options that will get you all the flash of the latest iPhone, for less.

No tactics and no tricks. Here’s our Ting pricing promise.

Ting pricing

This blog post partly comes out of internal conversations we have all the time here about Ting pricing and promotions on both Ting Mobile and Ting Internet. But to be honest, it mostly comes out of a phone call I had with my cable company recently.

On behalf of Ting (without actually running it by everybody first), I vow that we will never do any of the following:

How much data does Google Maps use?

how much data does Google maps use?

How much data does Google Maps use?

The short answer: Google Maps doesn’t use much mobile data at all when navigating. In our experiments, it’s about 5 MB per hour of driving. Most of Google Maps data use is incurred when initially searching for the destination and charting a course (which you can do on Wi-Fi). There are ways to ensure Google Maps doesn’t use any mobile data at all when driving.

Understanding IMEI – Should I give out my IMEI number?

What is an IMEI number? The VIN of the mobile world

If you’ve ever looked at used cars, you know the importance of running a vehicle identification number (VIN) check before you commit to anything. This little 17-character string says a lot about the car you’re looking at.

If you’ve ever sold a used car privately, you know that the VIN is among the first things a serious buyer will ask for. Providing it shows you’re acting in good faith. Not providing it is probably a deal breaker.

The mobile phone world has an analog to automotive VIN. It’s called the IMEI. What that stands for isn’t important for this discussion, though you may sometimes see different initialisms (MEID, ESN) for what is, in effect, the same idea: A unique identifier that says a lot about a device.

tl;dr: Used device buyers: Always ask for the IMEI. Don’t buy without it. Used device sellers: If a buyer asks for a phone’s IMEI and seems cool, provide it.

The easiest way to find the IMEI of just about any smartphone is by simply opening the phone dialer and inputting *#06#. The IMEI will pop up on the screen. Here’s the same information in animated GIF form (the best of all the forms).

Finding an IMEI – Android.
Finding an IMEI – iPhone.

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