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What does a T-Mobile / Sprint merger mean to Ting customers?

After many false starts, it looks as though the long-rumored Sprint and T-Mobile merger will be going ahead. For customers of an MVNO that offers service on both carrier networks, there are some very reasonable questions that come up.

What does a T-Mobile / Sprint merger mean to Ting and to Ting customers? For the foreseeable future, it doesn’t mean anything at all. Looking a little further downfield, we see this as a positive thing for Ting and for customers of established MVNOs like Ting.

First, we have no reason to believe that the conjoined entity will value the wholesale part of the business (that is, MVNOs) any differently than either carrier does today. What a viable MVNO like Ting offers to a carrier partner is guaranteed revenue with a minimum of effort attached. Easy money in so many words. We don’t see either carrier walking away from that, not now while they’re operating quasi-independently or later when they’re one carrier.

Sascha Segan from PC Mag takes the argument a step further, making a strong case for why the new T-Mobile needs to keep MVNOs happy.

The soon-to-be megacarrier has already talked about roaming across the two networks. Taking a longer view, the two networks will necessarily become one. Both in the near and the longer term, that means broader coverage all across the US on what is, for all intents and purposes, one network. That’s a good thing for Ting customers overall, so we’re happy about that too.

All these positives aside, Ting has always been an advocate for more competition, not less. Three “major carriers” is obviously less than four. Were this merger approved even six or seven years ago, the outlook might have been very different. However, MVNOs are one-way competition has been effectively forced on an industry that’s, shall we say, change-averse.

We always have and will keep our options open when it comes to working with carrier partners. In short, though, it’s MVNO business as usual.

Net neutrality repeal statement

As it now seems was inevitable, yesterday the FCC overturned “net neutrality” regulations that were put in place to protect an Open Internet.

Now, Internet service providers – ISPs – will be allowed to prioritize and deprioritize traffic as they see fit. It’s good news for myopic ISPs and their investors but bad news for Internet innovation in North America and, more importantly, for people without choices of ISPs who put their customers first.

Ting’s stance on net neutrality is and will remain unchanged: We will never block, throttle or otherwise interfere with the online activity of our customers.

As a company actively working and investing to build and support fiber networks in Ting towns around the US, we can definitively say that net neutrality had no bearing on our decision to help build the next generation of Internet infrastructure North America so sorely needs. The repeal of net neutrality protections won’t change how we continue this important work, and will not change our continued operation of Ting Internet under the principles of net neutrality.

The FCC plans to kill net neutrality. Here’s how to stop them

net neutrality

A brief overview of the FCC’s plan to kill net neutrality

Net neutrality seems to be on everyone’s mind right now as we steel ourselves for the FCC’s upcoming vote on December 14. It seems the top priority for these Trump-appointed FCC members is to overturn the net neutrality regulations that were hard won under the last administration. Next month’s vote to do just that is very likely to pass by a three-to-two margin.

Right now, the Internet is classified as a public utility under Title II. This allows each Internet user the ability to do what they want online, without preferential treatment given to some websites that would make them faster than others. That’s one of the biggest concerns, that without net neutrality, the Internet will become like two lanes of traffic: the high-speed lane in which the industry’s bigwigs and corporations pay for faster delivery speeds, and the throttled slow lane for everyone else, including startups and lesser-known companies that can’t afford the fast lane.

Telcos want control of the Internet. Together we can still stop them.

Time is running out to protect the Internet as we know it.

Today is a day to rally. A day to talk, to reach out and especially to act.

It’s the last chance to fight to keep fair and equal access to the Internet. The day we exercise our freedom of speech to maintain the same right online. The day we hold high the principle of common carriage; the principal that service providers must serve the general public without discrimination. A principle that started with blacksmiths, innkeepers and ship owners and is today part of our social contracts with public airlines, railroads, buses, taxicabs, freight and phone companies and yes, Internet service providers. The latter, because as Public Knowledge said so succinctly:

“Networks are so vital to the functioning of society that the maintenance of such networks cannot be left to the market solely.”

Click to join the fight to maintain net neutrality protections before the FCC enacts its new anti-net neutrality plansThe Internet is the world’s principal source of information. We deserve access to all lawful content unedited, unfiltered, uncensored, unfettered. We want real journalism, not an echo chamber. We want to hear all voices, not only the ones who’ve paid to speak.

We don’t want a two-tiered system controlling online communication. We are not alone.

At Tucows, Ting’s parent company, we believe the Internet is the greatest agent for positive change the world has even seen. We are thrilled and humbled by what can be achieved when billions of people have access to information and a vehicle to communicate, collaborate and co-create. We are increasingly wary of large corporations that are willing to compromise customer experiences and impede progress to protect market share. We are similarly concerned about politicians that legislate on the Internet without truly understanding the world they are affecting.

So today we ask you to join our voice to protect the open Internet, by asking the FCC to preserve net neutrality. It’s easy. We promise.

Join the Heard

Introducing the $130 Moto E4 – Available now in the Ting Shop

Unboxing the Moto E4

 

We like a lot of what Moto has been doing. It’s an opinion based on having tried and tested out more phones from more manufacturers than we care to count. We like the ethos behind Moto E so we were excited to get our hands on the Moto E4.

Budget phones too often come up wanting. While you’re obviously letting go of premium build quality and features in staying under the $150 mark, the Moto E line has always impressed on price vs. performance.

We took the Moto E (2nd gen) for an extended test drive and, even stepping straight down from the flagship Nexus 6P, we were impressed.

The latest Moto E is the Moto E4 and it’s available in the Ting Shop now for $129.

Kajeet customers: $35 credit + $25 for each additional phone you bring to Ting

Choice is the upside of competition. Today we have more choice in cell phone providers… though we had slightly more yesterday. Family-focused carrier Kajeet has decided to shut down its phone service to instead focus on its Internet efforts.

That leaves a number of Kajeet customers making plans for where to take their phone service.

May we present Ting as the most — arguably the only — logical choice for anyone that liked Kajeet’s kids and family focus.

In short: You can bring your Kajeet phones and numbers to Ting and be up and running in minutes. No contracts or BS. Here, you’ll get powerful tools that put you in control.

Displaced Kajeet customers: we think you’ll really like Ting. We’re happy to offer you $35 to get started with one phone. We’ll also credit your account an additional $25 for each additional phone you add to your Ting account. For a family with four phones for example, that’s $110 in Ting credit. Ting credit is automatically applied to your Ting bill total and doesn’t expire.

The average Ting bill is just $23 a month per phone on an account.

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