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Strategically-Used Devices

One of the many advantages of the Ting pricing plan is that you can spend very little on a device that you use sparingly. You pay just $6 a month to keep that device active. You only pay for usage at all if it pushes your total account into a new bucket. If it is your only device, the buckets start at just $3 a month. You can use just one kind of service (voice, data, text) and leave the others at $0. Of course, if you do want to ramp up your usage at any time, the plan is there to accommodate you fairly.

In the context of choices out there, it’s the flexibility you might get from pre-paid with the efficiencies (account sharing), ease of use (no topping up), features and support you expect from an account on a major carrier.

Since launch, we have heard a bunch of great stories from customers about strategically-used Ting devices. A couple of these were in the “wow, we never even thought of that” category for us so I figured I’d share them.

The Leash

There were a bunch of moms and dads at our meetup in LA this week talking about this. They’re not quite ready to hand over a phone entirely to their kids (at which point, they will appreciate the visibility, alerts and administrative control they get in the new Ting dashboard), but they do want to be able to stay in touch with them after dropping them off at a movie or the mall. So, we’re talking around age 12 here. The feature phone (or maybe low end smartphone) comes out of the drawer when they need it and back in the drawer when they don’t.

The Backup

This one came from our buddies Robert and Carmela over at The Bike Stop in Philly. (No, I didn’t just Rick Roll you. That’s the site.) They have cable and Wifi at the bar and they rely heavily on data for crucial functions like credit card processing and inventory management. They realized that they should probably have a Plan B. So they keep a Huawei hotspot by the register. If they need it, they turn it on and tether all their machines to it. The usage simply gets pooled with the Ting smartphones they use every day. If they don’t need it, it’s $6 a month.

The Passport

It turns out we solve a big problem for people who don’t live in the US but spend a ton of time here for business or pleasure. People like our Canadian friend Amber MacArthur. (It’s my blog post and I’ll name drop if I want to.) These folks have either been living in the world of pre-paid (topping up, expiring minutes, random fees), enduring ungodly roaming charges or just going offline between landlines and Wifi. With Ting, they get their “US phone” set up to work just like their everyday phone and they’re all set. Or maybe they tether their everyday phone to their Ting phone and just use the Ting phone for voice. (Either way, they need to remember to shut off data roaming on both phones so they don’t end up getting slammed on the wrong side of the border.)

Right now, non-US residents can only activate a Ting phone on the site if they have a US credit card. It is on our backlog to make this available for everyone on the site.

My Dad

I’ll use my own example here. “Dad, we don’t have to synchronize watches. I’ll call you when I’m walking up to the stadium.” “OK, I’ll try to remember to turn my phone on.” “Why don’t you just keep your phone on?” “I don’t know, I don’t want to rack up charges for any reason.” “Are you planning on butt-dialing Bolivia? I’m one of like three people that knows your cellphone number.” “We have a small plan and I don’t want to get hit with overages.” Ah, yes, overages. Now, to be clear, putting a senior parent on your plan means putting yourself in the role of account administrator and customer support. It’s a generous thing to do. To be honest, I haven’t done it yet.

If anyone has more examples of how the Ting plans have helped solve a particular problem (or maybe examples of problems that nobody seems to be solving just yet), please let us know.

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