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Ask an Exec: Where do you find efficiencies between towns?

When you’re laying and lighting geographically separated fiber networks, you learn a thing or two along the way.

Tucows CEO Elliot Noss explains when one-size-fits-all is the right approach and when hyper-local is the best way to go.

Ask an Exec: Does Ting prefer to own the network or light the network?

Should a city or town own the fiber networks? Or should they look to the private sector to bring better Internet to its people?

Tucows CEO Elliot Noss explains that, while a town should probably want to own the infrastructure, it’s just not feasible for some places to make it happen.

Ask an Exec: Does building fiber Internet in a small town like Sandpoint make sense?

By population, Sandpoint, ID and the Greater Sandpoint Area make for the smallest potential Ting town that we’ve considered.

So, how does Ting’s strategy of bringing fiber Internet to smaller towns like Sandpoint, ID make fiscal sense? Tucows CEO Elliot Noss explains.

Meet Ting Internet Customer, Ross McDermott

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We’d like to take a moment to introduce you to one of our Ting Internet Customers in Charlottesville, VA.

Meet Ross McDermott, founder of Surface Below Media, a video production company specializing in documentaries, music videos, art films and commercials (click those links to view samples of the kind of work they do). His team operates from a studio space shared by a collective of artists and artisans. The studio gets Ting’s crazy fast fiber Internet, so Surface Below Media and others in the coworking space all get access. Naturally, we wanted to hear how the fastest Internet access around is working out for them.

Before they moved to the studio space downtown, Ross tells us they were paying for the fastest Internet Comcast could provide to their office. But it just wasn’t fast enough to keep up with huge file transfers during video production. They were also pretty disappointed in the quality of customer service they’d been receiving from local Internet companies. So they switched to Ting last August, and everything changed.

The Long March to Fiber Will Take Many Roads…

fiberSusan Crawford wrote a much-talked about piece last week entitled “You Didn’t Notice It, But Google Fiber Just Began the Golden Age of High Speed Internet Access.” She’s right about the problem, but the Golden Age is going to be far more complex and harder to achieve than the article lets on: we are a long way from a truly competitive market for broadband. In fact, to get there, competition is not the most important element. For now the most important thing is to get places fibered up. How that should happen depends on local variables. But the path Google has taken in Huntsville: leaving the ownership of the broadband system in the hands of the town and renting dark fiber, rather than ceding it to the company providing the service, will happen only in the minority of places. And I say this as the CEO of a company that is laying fiber in cities and towns despite telling mayors they should own it themselves.

Ask an Exec: Will running for public office help bring Ting Internet to my city?

Matt V on Twitter wonders whether running for public office would increase the chances of bringing Ting Internet to his city.

Michael Goldstein, VP of Marketing at Ting, explains how you can help influence your local government into bringing crazy fast fiber Internet to your town.

We’re also assessing demand through the Ting Internet watch list – if you have yet to add your town or city to the mix, head here and fill out the form!